This is Fractopia

ThisIsFractopia.com is the home base of the Fractopia Podcast: forecasting the facts of tomorrow through the fiction of today. In this series, AIP founder Tod Foley examines current trends and developments in technology and science fiction, in order to create realistic visions of our potential tomorrow. Readers and writers of near-future science fiction will find

UbiquiCity

Tales of the Fractopian Future Nine authors collaborate to build a “Smart City” of the first world 100 years in the future, examining the results of projected modern trends such as ubiquitous computing, artificial intelligence, augmented reality, biotech, anti-aging and green technologies – alongside corporate governance and social upheaval. “UbiquiCity” is a work of interwoven

Surreal Science Fiction

Drawn broadly, the category of “surreal science fiction” includes two main classes of stories. One encompasses the first popular science fiction shorts, appearing in pulp magazines such as Amazing Stories and Astounding Stories (later to become Analog Science Fact & Fiction), and the other begins with the “new wave” literature of the 1960s and ’70s

ScenePlay enters Beta Testing

ScenePlay is a card-based collaborative narrative game that creates movie and tv stories. It’s one of my latest obsessions. ScenePlay Version 0.13 is a beta test document, which has been released to all members of the As If Collective for edification, playtesting and feedback. Support As If Productions and assorted AIP projects on Patreon:

The Difference between Narrative and Story

The words “Narrative” and “Story” are often used interchangeably, but they are not synonymous. The Difference between Narrative and Story is part of a structuralist approach to game design and interactive storytelling currently being explored by the As If Collective. These principles are at the root of the “ScenePlay” narrative card game system, currently in

Roleplaying Games – Where’s the Art?

Over at Coming Out of the Basement, Jack Stephenson-Carr is engaging in an in-depth analysis of the question (and the assumptions behind the question): “Are Roleplaying Games Art?” Here’s my take on it. Certainly they are, if they convey meaning. But they’re not guaranteed to do that, because there’s a lot of subjectivity involved. As